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Weight gain during pregnancy may risk premature birth, claims study

Weight gain after a certain point has a big role to play in children being born premature, as per new study. Abnormalities in interval between pregnancies, mother’s body mass index (BMI) prior to pregnancy and
India TV Lifestyle Desk New Delhi August 19, 2016 13:32 IST
India TV Lifestyle Desk

Weight gain after a certain point has a big role to play in children being born premature, as per new study.

Abnormalities in interval between pregnancies, mother’s body mass index (BMI) prior to pregnancy and the amount of weight gain in pregnancy can lead to preterm birth.

If these factors are kept in mind, then it could reduce the risk of premature births.

“The highest risks for premature birth were in women who were underweight, had poor weight gain during pregnancy, or short periods of time between pregnancies. Excessive weight gain in obese women also increased the risk,” said Emily DeFranco, Associate Professor at the University of Cincinnati.

DeFranco and her colleagues conducted the study from birth records of nearly 4,00,000 people. Potentially modifiable risk factors for preterm birth were present in more than 90 per cent of women in the study.

According to the study, it was found that 25.2 percent of women, who were underweight had the highest rate of preterm birth. Increased rates of preterm birth were seen for women with less than six months between gap between each pregnancy that stood at 12.9 per cent, and those with six to twelve months between pregnancies stood at 10.4 per cent.

Fewer than half of women begin pregnancy with a normal weight, and only 32 per cent achieve the recommended pregnancy weight gain.

“Attention should be paid to educational interventions on the importance of birth spacing, achieving an optimal pre-pregnancy weight, and ensuring adequate nutrition and weight gain during pregnancy. 

Improvements in these modifiable risk factors could have significant influence on premature birth and infant mortality worldwide,” DeFranco added.

The study is published in the journal Maternal and Child Health Journal,

(With agency input)