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Ajmal Kasab Read Holy Qoran Twice In Jail On Sunday

Pak terrorist Ajmal Kasab  woke up smiling at 6.30 am on Sunday.  He exchanged morning greetings with the guards manning his cell.  For breakfast he ate bread, tea and milk.  Lunch consisted of six chapatis,
PTI May 05, 2010 12:16 IST
PTI
Pak terrorist Ajmal Kasab  woke up smiling at 6.30 am on Sunday.  He exchanged morning greetings with the guards manning his cell.  For breakfast he ate bread, tea and milk.  Lunch consisted of six chapatis, rice, daal and vegetables.  He even took his afternoon siesta for an hour peacefully.  He ate evening snacks and finished his cup of tea. He read books given to him. He spoke to jail guards as usual. This is Kasab's Sunday diary as reported by Mumbai Mirror.

When Kasab  was first put in solitary confinement, the 23-year-old terrorist clawed at the walls of his cell and tried to slash his wrist with serrated bottle caps he stole from water bottles provided to him.  

But  24 hours before the judgment, which could well be death, were a far cry from his early days at Arthur Road Jail. The terrorist had a regular day on Sunday and he remained largely unfazed as he went through his daily routine.

Barring for brief moments of pensiveness and an occasional brisk walk inside his cell, the captured LeT gunman showed few signs of nervousness.

The doctor, who carried out his medical examination and psychiatric evaluation, said, “We checked his pulse rate, heart beat, blood pressure and even the colour of his nails. Everything is normal. He has no fever which many criminals develop due to anxiety at a time like this.”

Dr Yusuf Machiswala, Honorary Professor at J J Hospital, said, “Criminals awaiting judgement or the gallows generally develop what is called anticipatory anxiety. It is exhibited in the form of high blood pressure, restlessness, sweating, nausea, loss of appetite, stomach churning, fever and cold hands and feet. Sometimes, the criminal's heart beat shoots up so much that jail staff have to call in doctors. There have been instances when such prisoners have collapsed in their cells.”  

Qasab was far from displaying any of these symptoms. He was, in fact, smiling when he woke up at about 6.30 am on Sunday. He even exchanged morning greetings with the guards manning his cell.

He ate his meals heartily, the sources said. For breakfast he had what he has every morning - bread, tea and milk. His lunch consisted of six chapatis, rice, daal and vegetables. Qasab even took his afternoon siesta of about an hour peacefully. He was served evening snacks, which he ate with a cup of tea.

He even read the books given to him. Through the dau he continued to speak to jail guards as he does every day.  

Though no medical examination was required in the evening as he seemed normal, doctors said that they continued to keep a watch on him. A team of three doctors from JJ Hospital  examined Qasab on Monday morning before he was produced in court.

The one sign, if there was any, that it was not just another day came when he read the Holy Koran twice, for 45 minutes each, instead of just once as is his practice. He also took brisk steps inside his cell a few times. “There were some moments when he looked lost in his thoughts,” said the jail source.

Other than that, a jail source, requesting anonymity, said, “He behaved as if it was just a regular day in his life. After his dinner at about 8 pm, he was just lying down.”

The source added that three days ago, in a casual conversation, Qasab had given away his optimism. He said he was well aware that the judicial process took its own time in India and that he would not be hanged so soon.