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Delhi law secretary seeks transfer, AAP minister rebukes him for not convening meeting of judges

New Delhi: Delhi's  law secretary A S Yadav has sought transfer after the Aam Aadmi Party law minister Somnath Bharti, a lawyer himself, ordered him  to convene a meeting of all Delhi judges, but the
India TV News Desk January 07, 2014 15:51 IST
India TV News Desk
New Delhi: Delhi's  law secretary A S Yadav has sought transfer after the Aam Aadmi Party law minister Somnath Bharti, a lawyer himself, ordered him  to convene a meeting of all Delhi judges, but the secretary told him this could be done only with the permission of Delhi High Court.

The law secretary  told him that it was the domain of the judiciary, and a minister from the executive was not supposed to convene such a meeting. Only the Delhi High Court can convene such a meeting, Yadav pointed out to the minister.

Bharti then accused Yadav, a judge on deputation himself, of being loyal to the old regime and placing hurdles in the work of the AAP government.

Frustrated, the law secretary A S Yadav wrote to the Chief Justice of Delhi High court  N V Ramana seeking repatriation to the judiciary.

The Chief Justice however assured him that the judiciary would protect him from any vindictive action from the minister.

Later, Law Minister Somnath Bharti told a newspaper that if for every small thing, one has to seek the permission of High Court, then what was the law minister supposed to do.

Bharti says he wanted to implement the AAP government's agenda of providing speedy justice to the poor, as he felt it was his duty towards the people.

The Law Minister said, he wanted to discuss judicial and legal reforms at the meeting of the judges, and without discussing these with the judges, how can the litigants' problems will be solved.

Bharti said, he only asked the law secretary to advise him as he was not aware of the protocol, but he said even for a meeting of judges, the ministry will have to seek the permission of the High court .