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Democracy is dead in DMK, says Karunanidhi's son Alagiri

Chennai: Stung by the DMK move to suspend him, former Union Minister M K Alagiri on Saturday charged that democracy was dead in the party and questioned why no action was taken against his younger
PTI January 26, 2014 10:59 IST
PTI
Chennai: Stung by the DMK move to suspend him, former Union Minister M K Alagiri on Saturday charged that democracy was dead in the party and questioned why no action was taken against his younger brother M K Stalin's supporters for pasting posters hailing him as future party president.

Alagiri said he was being "rewarded" for seeking justice on certain allegations made by some workers regarding internal elections in the party headed by his father M Karunanidhi.

He said he had taken up the matter with the party high command which promised a probe but did not act.

"Democracy is dead in the party. On January 31, I will meet the press in Madurai and submit proof (about alleged irregularities in internal polls)," he told reporters here.

When it was pointed out that he had been suspended for "creating confusion", he shot back saying if pasting posters supporting him was wrong, the same yardstick should be applied to Stalin and his supporters also.

"Is it wrong to paste posters supporting me. They (Stalin's supporters) describe him as future Chief Minister and even future party president when the party president (Karunanidhi) is alive," he said and asked why no action has been initiated against his brother's supporters.

Asked if he had been suspended for not accepting Stalin's leadership, he said he did not know that but added the action against him was planned one.

He reiterated that he will not contest the coming Lok Sabha polls or field rival candidates to DMK, saying "the party will lose by itself."

Cracking the whip, DMK had yesterday suspended Alagiri from all party posts and primary membership, telling him that his opposition to DMK-DMDK alliance is not going be taken lightly.

Announcing Alagiri's suspension, party general secretary K Anbazhagan charged Alagiri with asking party workers not to work, criticising disciplinary action taken against certain DMK members, "directly involving in improper discussions," and thus "creating confusion."

Asked if Alagiri's suspension would affect DMK and its poll prospects in particular, Karunanidhi had replied in the negative while Stalin denied any rift with his elder brother and described the action as a party affair.

Meanwhile Alagiri loyalists in Madurai today expressed anguish over his suspension, but said he would emerge stronger despite the 'temporary' setback. They also felt he had been unfairly treated.

One of his loyalists Isakkimuthu felt Alagiri had been suspended based on "false' information and opined that this was not good when Lok Sabha polls are round the corner.

Another man M Krishnan said he saw nothing wrong in Alagiri supporting those suspended from the party.

They pointed out Alagiri had played a key role in preventing DMK workers from joining hands with MDMK leader Vaiko, after he was dismissed from the party in 1993.

M M K Basha said DMK leaders themselves had praised Alagiri after victories in bypolls. The entire DMK cadre was with him after the last Lok Sabha polls and it would continue, he said.