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Not Shane Warne or Brett Lee, Adam Gilchrist rates this chinaman as the toughest he kept to

Adam Gilchrist is commonly considered as the best wicket-keeper in cricket history.
Written by: India TV Sports Desk New Delhi July 25, 2017 12:36 IST
India TV Sports Desk

Australia's legendary wicketkeeper Adam Gilchrist had one of the most nightmarish jobs in the world. He had to stand in the line of some of the most ferocious fast bowlers - Brett Lee and Shaun Tait - as they sent fireballs one after the other. Gilchrist also had to the tough task of picking Shane Warne's flippers and wrong'uns throughout the most part of his career.

However, despite having the pleasure of wicket-keeping to the likes of Warne, Glenn McGrath and Lee in his illustrious international career, the 45-year-old rated Michael Bevan as the most challenging bowler he kept to.

Bevan, the former left-handed batsman, was a one-day wizard with the bat as he was capable of timing even the most daunting run chase to perfection. However, he sometimes also engaged in part time left-arm leg-spin when asked by the captain to bowl.

"Bevo's not renowned for his bowling. Obviously his batting, he was so masterful in that, but he did contribute with some handy wickets at times. The left-arm leggie, fast action, is very difficult to pick out of the hand. That's why it was so challenging," Gilchrist told cricket.com.au.

"And Bevo will concede himself he didn't have the greatest control so whilst he could land it right on a sixpence he could also throw them far and wide too, so it was always a challenge," he added.

Gilchrist and Bevan played together in 175 ODIs while the duo have combined as 'keeper and bowler' in 45 occasions.

Bevan currently holds the record of capturing the best match figures by an Australian left-arm wrist-spinner in Test history, finishing with 10 for 113 against the West Indies at the Adelaide Oval in January, 1997.

The chinaman bowler, who appeared in a total of 18 Tests and 232 ODIs, notched up 36 wickets in the 50-over format besides also being a pivotal part of Australia's World Cup victories in 1999 and 2003.