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Jadeja-Anderson spat refuses to die down

New Delhi: The speed with which judicial commissioner Gordon Lewis threw out a Level Three charge against Anderson on Friday was an embarrassment for India, but they are showing little sign of taking it on
India TV Sports Desk August 05, 2014 15:43 IST
India TV Sports Desk
New Delhi: The speed with which judicial commissioner Gordon Lewis threw out a Level Three charge against Anderson on Friday was an embarrassment for India, but they are showing little sign of taking it on the chin and moving on.



Anderson, dramatically cleared of abusing and pushing Ravindra Jadeja last week, will go into Thursday's fourth Test needing only 13 wickets to become England's leading wicket-taker of all time but with India still seething over his behaviour at Trent Bridge.

An unnamed BCCI official was scathing in his criticism of England's attack leader on the respected Wisden India website and it is clear that a country who are used to getting their own way still hope to force an appeal.

‘Clearly the judgment is incorrect,' said the Indian official of a verdict made by Lewis in just 10 minutes after six hours of expensive evidence. ‘And it sets a very bad example. There were a series of errors. The level of abuse has been ridiculous and the ICC have a lot to answer for. What example does it set for kids and others watching? It sends the message that it is OK to abuse and push and you'll still go scot-free.

‘The umpire (Bruce Oxenford) has mentioned in his witness statement that Anderson used the ‘f' and ‘c' words repeatedly. Why haven't the officials reported him to the ICC? If they have, why has no action been taken?'

The comments confirm that the crux of India's high-handed complaint, which was driven by captain MS Dhoni despite attempts by the ICC, ECB and even his own Board to talk him out of it, was sparked by Anderson's sledging.

The question now is whether the Lancastrian can keep his aggression in check and still bowl as well as he did at the Ageas Bowl when he reached heights not seen from him for over a year. And avoid any more flashpoints.

Any appeal against the Australian judge's verdict — and Lewis also cleared Jadeja of all wrong-doing — can only come through ICC chief executive David  Richardson and there seemed  little appetite for official intervention on Monday despite India's huffing and puffing.

The deadline for an appeal and a further twist in this acrimonious tale is Friday.