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  • In this June 27, 2006 file photo, reviewed by a US Department of Defense official, U.S. military guards walk within Camp Delta military run prison, at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba. The classified diplomatic cables released by online whistle blower WikiLeaks and reported on by The New Tork Times cited documents showing the U.S. used hardline tactics to win approval from countries to accept freed detainees from Guantanamo Bay. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
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    In this June 27, 2006 file photo, reviewed by a US Department of Defense official, U.S. military guards walk within Camp Delta military run prison, at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba. The classified diplomatic cables released by online whistle blower WikiLeaks and reported on by The New Tork Times cited documents showing the U.S. used hardline tactics to win approval from countries to accept freed detainees from Guantanamo Bay. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

  • In this Nov. 19, 2010 file photo, US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton looks on during a joint news conference with Portuguese Foreign Minister Luis Amado after their meeting on Friday at the Necessidades palace in Lisbon. Clinton on Friday, Nov. 26, 2010 spoke with the Chinese government about the expected release of classified cables by the Wikileaks website. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
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    In this Nov. 19, 2010 file photo, US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton looks on during a joint news conference with Portuguese Foreign Minister Luis Amado after their meeting on Friday at the Necessidades palace in Lisbon. Clinton on Friday, Nov. 26, 2010 spoke with the Chinese government about the expected release of classified cables by the Wikileaks website. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)

  • In this July 25, 2007 file photo, Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, right, and French President Nicolas Sarkozy, unseen, stand during the singing of National anthems at the Bab Azizia Palace in Tripoli. The classified diplomatic cables released by online whistle blower WikiLeaks and reported on by The New York Times reported that Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was described as erratic and in the near constant company of a Ukrainian nurse who was described in one cable as a voluptuous blonde. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)
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    In this July 25, 2007 file photo, Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, right, and French President Nicolas Sarkozy, unseen, stand during the singing of National anthems at the Bab Azizia Palace in Tripoli. The classified diplomatic cables released by online whistle blower WikiLeaks and reported on by The New York Times reported that Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was described as erratic and in the near constant company of a Ukrainian nurse who was described in one cable as a voluptuous blonde. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)

  • FILE In this April 18, 2008 file photo, Italy's Premier elect Silvio Berlusconi, right, and Russia's President Vladmir Putin seen after a joint news conference following talks in Berlusconi's 'Villa Certosa' in Porto Rotondo, on the island region of Sardinia, Italy. The classified diplomatic cables released by online whistle blower WikiLeaks and reported by The New York Times said a batch of documents raised questions about Berlusconi and his relationship with Putin. One cable said Berlusconi appears increasingly to be the mouthpiece of Putin in Europe. (AP Photo/RIA Novosti, Mikhail Klimentyev, Presidential Press Service)
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    FILE In this April 18, 2008 file photo, Italy's Premier elect Silvio Berlusconi, right, and Russia's President Vladmir Putin seen after a joint news conference following talks in Berlusconi's 'Villa Certosa' in Porto Rotondo, on the island region of Sardinia, Italy. The classified diplomatic cables released by online whistle blower WikiLeaks and reported by The New York Times said a batch of documents raised questions about Berlusconi and his relationship with Putin. One cable said Berlusconi appears increasingly to be the mouthpiece of Putin in Europe. (AP Photo/RIA Novosti, Mikhail Klimentyev, Presidential Press Service)

  • FILE In this March 25, 2010 file photo, a Chinese flag blows in the air below the Google logo outside the Google China headquarters in Beijing. The classified diplomatic cables released by online whistle blower WikiLeaks and reported on by The New York Times cited a cable from the U.S. Embassy in Beijing that included allegations from a Chinese contact that China's Politburo directed a cyber intrusion into Google's computer systems as part of a coordinated campaign of computer sabotage carried out by government operatives, private security experts and Internet outlaws. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe, File)
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    FILE In this March 25, 2010 file photo, a Chinese flag blows in the air below the Google logo outside the Google China headquarters in Beijing. The classified diplomatic cables released by online whistle blower WikiLeaks and reported on by The New York Times cited a cable from the U.S. Embassy in Beijing that included allegations from a Chinese contact that China's Politburo directed a cyber intrusion into Google's computer systems as part of a coordinated campaign of computer sabotage carried out by government operatives, private security experts and Internet outlaws. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe, File)

  • FILE In this Nov. 17, 2007 file photo, Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, left, shakes hands with Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah, second from right, as Crown Prince Sultan, right, looks on at Riyadh airport, shortly after Ahmadinejad arrived to attend the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) summit in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The classified diplomatic cables released by online whistle blower WikiLeaks and reported by the London Guardian said some cables showed King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia repeatedly urging the United States to attack Iran to destroy its nuclear program. (AP Photo/Hasan Sarbakhshian, File)
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    FILE In this Nov. 17, 2007 file photo, Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, left, shakes hands with Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah, second from right, as Crown Prince Sultan, right, looks on at Riyadh airport, shortly after Ahmadinejad arrived to attend the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) summit in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The classified diplomatic cables released by online whistle blower WikiLeaks and reported by the London Guardian said some cables showed King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia repeatedly urging the United States to attack Iran to destroy its nuclear program. (AP Photo/Hasan Sarbakhshian, File)

  • FILE In this Feb. 27, 2005 file photo, The reactor building of Iran's nuclear power plant is seen, at Bushehr, Iran, 750 miles (1,245 kilometers) south of the capital Tehran. The classified diplomatic cables released by online whistle blower WikiLeaks and reported by the London Guardian said some cables showed King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia repeatedly urging the United States to attack Iran to destroy its nuclear program. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi, File)
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    FILE In this Feb. 27, 2005 file photo, The reactor building of Iran's nuclear power plant is seen, at Bushehr, Iran, 750 miles (1,245 kilometers) south of the capital Tehran. The classified diplomatic cables released by online whistle blower WikiLeaks and reported by the London Guardian said some cables showed King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia repeatedly urging the United States to attack Iran to destroy its nuclear program. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi, File)

  • FILE This undated file photo obtained by The Associated Press shows U.S. Army Pfc.Bradley Manning. The Obama administration has told whistleblower WikiLeaks that its expected imminent release of classified State Department cables will put countless lives at risk, threaten global counterterrorism operations and jeopardize U.S. relations with its allies. The U.S. says it has known for some time that WikiLeaks held the diplomatic cables. No one has been charged with passing them to the website, but suspicion focuses on U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning. (AP Photo, File)
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    FILE This undated file photo obtained by The Associated Press shows U.S. Army Pfc.Bradley Manning. The Obama administration has told whistleblower WikiLeaks that its expected imminent release of classified State Department cables will put countless lives at risk, threaten global counterterrorism operations and jeopardize U.S. relations with its allies. The U.S. says it has known for some time that WikiLeaks held the diplomatic cables. No one has been charged with passing them to the website, but suspicion focuses on U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning. (AP Photo, File)

  • FILE This Aug. 14, 2010 photo shows WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in Stockholm, Sweden. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton on Friday, Nov. 26, 2010 spoke with the Chinese government about the expected release of classified cables by the Wikileaks website. The release of hundreds of thousands of cables is expected this weekend, though Wikileaks has not specified the timing. (AP Photo/Scanpix/Bertil Ericson, File)
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    FILE This Aug. 14, 2010 photo shows WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in Stockholm, Sweden. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton on Friday, Nov. 26, 2010 spoke with the Chinese government about the expected release of classified cables by the Wikileaks website. The release of hundreds of thousands of cables is expected this weekend, though Wikileaks has not specified the timing. (AP Photo/Scanpix/Bertil Ericson, File)

  • FILE In this Dec. 9, 1999 file photo, the State Department building is shown in Washington. Hundreds of thousands of State Department documents leaked Sunday, Nov. 28, 2010 revealed a hidden world of backstage international diplomacy, divulging candid comments from world leaders and detailing occasional U.S. pressure tactics aimed at hot spots in Afghanistan, Iran and North Korea. (AP Photo/Wayne Partlow, File)
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    FILE In this Dec. 9, 1999 file photo, the State Department building is shown in Washington. Hundreds of thousands of State Department documents leaked Sunday, Nov. 28, 2010 revealed a hidden world of backstage international diplomacy, divulging candid comments from world leaders and detailing occasional U.S. pressure tactics aimed at hot spots in Afghanistan, Iran and North Korea. (AP Photo/Wayne Partlow, File)

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